Another Chapter in the Saga of Ohio’s Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow

The Columbus Dispatch reminds us where we are in the story of ECOT, Ohio’s online charter school, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. Currently the Ohio Supreme Court is considering ECOT’s “lawsuit fighting the state’s requirement that the online charter school repay $60 million for unverified enrollment for the 2015-16 school year. The state says the school owes another $19 million for the same reason in 2016-17.”

In an editorial last Friday, the Dispatch describes what seems to be the unraveling of the scam William Lager has been running for years with the support of Ohio legislators to whom Lager has generously contributed: “Overall, it has been a trying year for ECOT.  What was for years a smoothly operating business plan—signing up students in droves and billing taxpayers for their education, regardless of whether the students actually logged in to get one—was interrupted by state officials demanding accountability for all that money. Instead of taking the school’s word on attendance, the Department of Education demanded to see ECOT log-in records.  That led to a finding that ECOT had overbilled taxpayers by 143 percent, and an order to repay $60 million for the 2015-16 school year.  That was just for starters; the department is auditing ECOT for other school years. In September, it said the school owes another $19 million in overpayments, for the 2016-17 school year.  As ECOT is laying off employees and slashing its budget to cope with the clawback, Yost (Dave Yost, Ohio’s state auditor) has said that a proportional share of the repayment should come from the for-profit companies, owned by ECOT founder Bill Lager, with which ECOT contracts for services.”

It appears that ECOT officials launched a new strategy last week: blame ECOT’s attendance officer, who had complained all along that the school was not providing the adequate computer software for him to do his job. The Dispatch reports that, as of last Friday, ECOT’s truancy administrator, Patrick Tingler, has resigned. Tingler had testified last year in a deposition that ECOT’s software left him unable to add up the total number of days students were absent without an excuse. He had complained that he had to compute such records manually. The Dispatch adds: “Tingler’s truancy software did track consecutive days students missed, but ECOT crafted a more-relaxed truancy rule for itself than the one called for in the Ohio Revised Code. Instead of missing five or seven consecutive days to be considered truant, ECOT used 30 days, Tingler testified. This truancy measure appears nowhere in state law… After students log in, Tingler testified, he didn’t track whether they participated in any classwork, which is at the heart of the state funding lawsuit.”

ECOT’s other recently exposed strategy has been to rally powerful friends and endorsers behind its lawsuit challenging the Ohio Department of Education’s effort to claw back overpayments to the school.  Steve Dyer of Innovation Ohio reports that five former Republican state legislators filed an amicus brief supporting ECOT’s lawsuit. Together the five “have received more than $50,000 in campaign contributions from Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow founder William Lager, and nearly $135,000 total from Lager and David Brennan—Ohio’s charter school Godfather.”

The Columbus Dispatch explains that William Batchelder is among the five: “William G. Batchelder is described in the brief as the former House speaker, and a former common pleas and appeals court judge. It does not mention that, until late July, his lobbying firm, The Batchelder Company, represented ECOT founder Bill Lager.”

Steve Dyer adds: “In fact, the lead legislator on the filing is William Batchelder—one of the longest serving state legislators in history, who was Brennan’s bag man on Ohio’s school voucher legislation in the mid-1990s. Batchelder left the legislature in 2014. Shortly after that, he fell into a new job—lobbying for Bill Lager. Makes sense. Lager had paid him $45,000 (not to mention the tens of thousands he paid to the Ohio House Republican Caucus during Batchelder’s time as Speaker of the House). Batchelder collected $67,000 from Brennan, and even more if you include Brennan’s wife, Ann.”

Ohio awaits a decision from the Ohio Supreme Court.  Will the court permit the Ohio Department of Education to claw back millions in overpayments from taxpayers to the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow?  Or will the Court back ECOT’s claim that Ohio law was unfairly updated without enough warning when the state began demanding accurate log-in records to document student participation at the online school?  Steve Dyer reminds his readers that four of the seven justices on Ohio’s elected Supreme Court have received campaign contributions from ECOT’s William Lager.

This blog has covered the ECOT scandal extensively.

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One thought on “Another Chapter in the Saga of Ohio’s Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow

  1. This information continues to stun me as a citizen who had advocated against vouchers and chartter schools for years! And to think that the Supreme Court will even hear this case is ludicrous. What concerns me is the monies that exchanged hands to these Justices .. will they recuse themselves? How can they think they can be fair in making a decision? And once again, the state taxpayers are footing the bill … time, payroll, and more for this whole process!

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