Test-and-Punish Just Hangs on as Failed Education Strategy

ESSA, the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015, is like an old, altered, jacket, now frayed at the cuffs. The fabric was never really good in the first place and, when the jacket was made over, the alternations didn’t do much to improve the design. Not much noticed at the back of the closet, the jacket sags there. But it would take too much energy to throw it away.

Pretty much everybody agrees these days that the 2001 school “reform” law, No Child Left Behind, was a failure. The Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos went to the American Enterprise Institute the other day and criticized the education policies of George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

And at the other end of the political spectrum, on January 8, 2018, the 16th anniversary of the day President George W. Bush signed No Child Left Behind, Diane Ravitch declared, “NCLB, as it was known, is the worst federal education legislation ever passed by Congress.  It was punitive, harsh, stupid, ignorant about pedagogy and motivation, and ultimately a dismal failure… The theory was simple, simplistic, and stupid: test, then punish or reward.”

In December, 2015, Congress made over No Child Left Behind by passing the Every Student Succeeds Act.  While the law reduces the reach of the Secretary of Education and requires that the states instead of the federal government develop plans for punishing the so-called “failing” schools, ESSA, as the new version is called, keeps annual standardized testing and perpetuates the philosophy that the way to make educators raise test scores faster is to keep on with the sanctions.  ESSA remains a test-and-punish law.

But now it seems ESSA is going out of use like that old, remade jacket. The states, as required, have churned out their ESSA school improvement plans and submitted them to the U.S. Department of Education, and Betsy DeVos’s staff people have been busy approving them—in batches.  This week the Department approved a batch of eleven such plans—from Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.  Education Week‘s federal education reporter, Alyson Klein describes the eleven plans that were approved this week.

Ohio’s was one of the plans approved, and Patrick O’Donnell at the Plain Dealer perfectly captures the irony of the now pretty meaningless process in Ohio’s ESSA Plan Wins Federal Approval—and Few Care: “Though many observers nationally and here in Ohio had hoped states would present grand new visions for schools through the new plans mandated by 2015’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), that hasn’t happened… State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria’s plan made few changes to the state’s testing and report card system, promising little more than making sure the state follows federal law. A new vision and approach?  That’s all being handled separately, just not in the plan. Critics wanted the plan to make big cuts in state tests. It doesn’t but DeMaria and the state school board later asked the legislature for those cuts.  Others wanted the plan to reduce the use of tests in teacher evaluations.  DeMaria and a panel of educators are seeking those changes apart from the submitted plan. And some wanted the state to show a vision for schools that was less reliant on test scores in academic subjects. School board members and several panels of educators have been meeting the last few months to build new goals that are far more focused on the ‘whole child’ than before.”

There is even some talk in Columbus about the problems of the state’s “A”-“F” letter grades to rate and rank schools and school districts, despite that Ohio’s school report cards with letter grades are a feature of the ESSA plan Ohio submitted and that was approved this week.

The 2015, Every Student Succeeds Act is merely a made over version of No Child Left Behind—made over because Congress wasn’t really ready to accept that the law’s overall strategy of high stakes testing and a succession of punishments has accomplished neither of NCLB’s overall goals: helping the children who have been left behind and closing achievement gaps.

But consensus about No Child Left Behind’s overall failure and the failure of it punitive strategy keeps on growing.  Harvard University’s Daniel Koretz put several more nails in its coffin in his excellent new book The Testing Charade: Pretending to Make Schools Better. Please read this book. In it Koretz shows exactly why the scheme of testing all students and punishing the teachers and the schools where scores do not rise quickly cannot work—why the scheme is merely a charade:  “One aspect of the great inequity of the American educational system is that disadvantaged kids tend to be clustered in the same schools. The causes are complex, but the result is simple: some schools have far lower average scores—and, particularly important in this system, more kids who aren’t ‘proficient’—than others. Therefore, if one requires that all students must hit the proficient target by a certain date, these low-scoring schools will face far more demanding targets for gains than other schools do. This was not an accidental byproduct of the notion that ‘all children can learn to a high level.’ It was a deliberate and prominent part of many of the test-based accountability reforms… Unfortunately… it seems that no one asked for evidence that these ambitious targets for gains were realistic. The specific targets were often an automatic consequence of where the Proficient standard was placed and the length of time schools were given to bring all students to that standard, which are both arbitrary.” (pp. 129-130) “The result was, in many cases, unrealistic expectations that teachers simply couldn’t meet by any legitimate means.” (p. 134)

If our society were intent on helping the children who have been left behind, we would invest in ameliorating poverty and in supporting the hard working teachers in the schools in our poorest communities. Things like reauthorizing the Children’s Health Insurance Program would help!  The ESSA plans being submitted to the Department of Education aren’t having much impact at all.  The old, made-over NCLB jacket is slowly slipping to the back of the closet.

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8 thoughts on “Test-and-Punish Just Hangs on as Failed Education Strategy

  1. If not so infuriating, this era of idiocy would be hilarious. Jan properly observes that ESSA is a frayed garment, no better than the ill-fitting polyester jacket that it followed. But no person who understands children and learning ever thought the wardrobe would keep our children warm in the first place. NCLB was stupid legislation, crafted by lobbyists and politicians who know less about children and learning than I know about Astrophysics, which is quite limited indeed. Many of us, I say without any particular pride or pleasure, predicted precisely what NCLB would do: Leave most of the children behind. It was based on the preposterous notion that Hansel and Gretel would gain weight by being weighed more often. It drove all the learning out of schools and then expected to see “results.” I think home schooling is anti-democratic and does a disservice to children, since social context is such a crucial part of learning. But, given the horrific things foisted on schools and children by politics and politicians, many of America’s children would be better off to stay home . . . if they even have a home in this increasingly unjust society.

    • I’ve heard the one about NCLB being based on the proposition that if you didn’t want to wait for 9 months to have a baby you simply impregnated 9 women, but this one matches up better: “[NCLB] was based on the preposterous notion that Hansel and Gretel would gain weight by being weighed more often…”

  2. Sir Ken Robinson, in one of his TED talks, recounts a warning from his UK friends as he and his family prepared to locate to the U.S. They shared that they would need to be prepared for Americans’ poor understanding of the concept of irony. He continues by providing his audience with proof that we do indeed get irony. He cites the naming of the education reform act, No Child Left Behind, as demonstrable proof. Naming an act No Child Left Behind when, by its very design, it would leave millions of students behind, was irony at its best.
    In this same vein we can recognize the Department of Education’s continued commitment to irony with its successor legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act. It’s as if educational reformers have been hired to write material for late night TV shows.
    The Ohio response, similar in most important ways to plans and state agency actions in other states, represents a strong example of the power of confirmation bias – don’t confuse me with facts and research, I need to continue to believe what I believe.

  3. Reblogged this on Mister Journalism: "Reading, Sharing, Discussing, Learning" and commented:
    by janresseger
    ESSA, the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015, is like an old, altered, jacket, now frayed at the cuffs. The fabric was never really good in the first place and, when the jacket was made over, the alternations didn’t do much to improve the design. Not much noticed at the back of the closet, the jacket sags there. But it would take too much energy to throw it away.

    Pretty much everybody agrees these days that the 2001 school “reform” law, No Child Left Behind, was a failure. The Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos went to the American Enterprise Institute the other day and criticized the education policies of George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

    And at the other end of the political spectrum, on January 8, 2018, the 16th anniversary of the day President George W. Bush signed No Child Left Behind, Diane Ravitch declared,

  4. I agree that ESSA is no improvement over NCLB. Unfortunately, it’s worse. This legislation has enabled the gold-rush to online/digital learning, which effectively outsources even public school classrooms to software vendors, diminishes the autonomy and expertise of classroom teachers, and spews out an enormous amount of personally identifiable childhood data to be mined for profit. “Personalization” via algorithm does not enhance learning; it enhances privatization and atomization. I don’t have the wherewithal to provide the evidence on the spot, but I assert that “follow the money” would go a long way to exposing the motivations behind this counter-productive scam on America’s children, families, and public schools.

  5. Pingback: HEJE Overview 1-20-18: Education

  6. Pingback: 2018 Medley #2 – Live Long and Prosper

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